sábado, 10 de febrero de 2018

Improving broadband in Ireland



Ireland is a developed but improvable country in broadband, as we analyze in collaboration with Muireann Duffy. With rural electrification in 1940-1950, electricity began to be consumed by households on a daily basis throughout the entire country, paving the way for computers and other such technologies to become staples in Irish homes.
 Resultat d'imatges de irlanda

Ireland's first form of internet connection came via DSL (digital subscriber line) connections, which connected computers or routers to telephone wires, which were already installed in the vast majority of Irish homes, in order to access the internet. Seeing as Ireland is now regarded as one of the most technologically advanced countries in Europe, if not the world, it is hard to believe these DSL connections only came into use just before the turn of the millennium, meaning that the ordinary people of Ireland have only had household access to internet for roughly 20 years.


Although access to the internet increased the quality of life for many people in terms of business, communication, recreation etc., issues with ease of access, speed and reliability were plentiful. Using a DSL connection to connect to the internet required unplugging the household phone or ‘landline’, meaning that no calls could be made or received while the internet was in use. Alternatively, a connection separate to the phone line could be installed, but this was too expensive an option for many households.

As the demand for internet access continued to grow in Ireland, DSL connections were no longer fit for purpose, leading to its replacement, broadband. The first broadband connections began to be installed in Ireland in the early 2000’s, finally allowing somewhat greater speed and ending the need for connections via phone lines. Although broadband was a huge step forward for internet in the county, it still had a long way to go before it reached the standard that we have today.

As the Irish economy began to boom in the 2000’s, during what is known as the ‘Celtic Tiger’ era, the need for high speed broadband became more essential than ever. As many multinational companies began searching for locations to set up European headquarters, it was essential that Ireland had adequate broadband speeds in order to draw MNCs to our country.

Ireland became a huge point of interest for many of these companies, such as DELL, Pfizer, eBay, Google, to name but a few, for a number of reasons. Having access to a well educated, English speaking workforce in a county with a Common Law system was very attractive for these companies, with the added incentive of Ireland’s extremely low corporate tax level of just 12.5%, a number of MNC’s began to set up shop in the a number of cities throughout Ireland, mainly Dublin, but also in the likes of Cork, Galway and Limerick. These companies in turn aided the development of broadband services in Ireland as it was essential to the maintenance of their business interests.

While broadband for businesses rose to an exceptional standard in a number of larger towns and cities throughout Ireland, the problem remained that the majority of households were left with substandard internet access.

For the first number of years, Ireland’s broadband was almost exclusively distributed by ‘Eircom’, formerly Telecom Éireann, which was a state-sponsored body. It was not until the Government began the privatisation of Eircom that other broadband providers began to emerge.

With a greater choice of providers for consumers, competition between broadband providers grew and grew. While at first the companies attempted to gain customers through reduced prices, eventually this competition led to the improvement of broadband networks in order for these companies to offer their users higher speeds.

While Ireland became a forerunner in Europe for broadband connection speeds, many outside observers failed to identify the divide between urban and rural broadband networks. While cities like Dublin operated at world class broadband speeds, parts of rural Ireland were still being forced to use DSL connections, as broadband simply wasn’t good enough in their areas.

In 2011, a study conducted by the International Telecommunication Union found that 77% of the Irish population, amounting to 3.6 million people, were active internet users, placing Ireland as the 70th nation in the world for internet usage. These findings illustrated that the internet usage was becoming a basic need for the people of Ireland and measures had to be put in place to rectify the below par standard of broadband in rural Ireland.

In August 2012, Minister for Communications, Energy and Natural Resources, Pat Rabbitte announced a National Broadband Scheme with the aim of improving broadband services throughout the country. In his speech, Minister Rabbitte outlined what the government hoped to achieve with the scheme: 70-100 Mbit/s broadband service available to at least 50% of the population, at least 40 Mbit/s available to at least a further 20% and a minimum of 30 Mbit/s available to everyone, no matter how rural or remote their area.

In 2016, the new Minister for Communication, Dennis Naughton announced that the National Broadband Scheme had been delayed, but efforts are being made to this day to ensure that the government fulfill their promise, especially to the people of rural Ireland who remain with reliable, high-speed internet connections in an age where internet access is becoming regarded as a basic human right.

Although the delays to the NBS have left rural Ireland lagging behind, urban Ireland has continued to push ahead with the arrival of ‘Virgin Media’ introducing fibre optic connections to Irish towns and villages for the first time. These fibre optic connects have once again increased internet connection speeds and pushed Ireland ahead of many countries once again in terms of broadband capabilities.

As continues to be the case since the privatisation of Telecom Éireann as I mentioned previously, the broadband sector in Ireland has continued to expand, with a wide range of providers now becoming available to consumers, for example: Eir, Vodafone, Three, Virgin Media, Sky, etc. This high level of competition between companies has ensured that high-quality service, competitive prices and high-speed internet to many Irish consumers.

Membership in the European Union may also aid Ireland’s attempts to improve broadband in rural areas as it has previously been outlined by the European Commission’s President, Jean-Claude Juncker, that every effort will be made to improve essential infrastructure throughout the European Union, including broadband, transport and hospitals. This follows a period of frugality in the Union, which was necessary due to the collapse of a number of EU countries’ economies, including Ireland. The lack of spending on infrastructure by both the Irish government and the EU during this period of economic downturn has led to an increased need for funding now to insure citizens can continue to access services which they require daily. In order to enhance the Irish broadband network, major investment is needed urgently and a joint effort from both the Irish government and the EU is needed to optimise broadband in Ireland.

In conclusion, despite Ireland’s ranking as 37th in regards to fixed downloading speeds (or 53rd for mobile downloading speeds), a lot of work still needs to be done to improve the standard of internet access available to Irish citizens throughout the nation. As a country that is so reliant on business from overseas, especially in areas of technology a reaffirmation of the National Broadband Scheme is essential in order to continue to push Ireland down the track of high-speed and reliable internet access.

We analyze international broadband evolution (here, the case of Ireland) in this blog, in Research Group about Digital Journalism and Marketing and Broadband and in Research Group on Innovative Monetization Systems of Digital Journalism, Marketing and Tourism (SIMPED), from CECABLE,  Escola Universitària Mediterrani of UdGUPF and Blanquerna-URL, in Twitter (@CECABLEresearch), Google+, in the group of LinkedIn, in the page of LinkedIn, in the group of Facebook, in Instagram (CECABLE), in Pinterest and in this blog. We will go in deep in the XXIII Cable and Broadband Catalonia Congress (10-11 April 2018, Barcelona).

36 comentarios:

  1. A very interesting analysis about broadband in Ireland!

    ResponderEliminar
  2. Citizenship and enterprise need broadband.

    ResponderEliminar
  3. El artículo nos habla de la brecha que sufre Irlanda respecto a las conexiones de banda ancha. Aunque se trata un país pionero en cuanto a la incursión de internet en su sociedad en primer lugar a través del DSL, seguido del ADSL. Irlanda que siempre se ha encontrado en los primeros puestos en cuanto a avances tecnológicos, sufre una brecha periurbana y rural. El internet no llega igual de bien a los ciudadanos de los centros urbanos que a los que se encuentran en las afueras o en zonas rurales. En mi opinión esto se debe a dos factores principales:
    En primer lugar, encontramos la falta de inversión en infraestructuras, lo que provoca que la señal no pueda llegar con igual intensidad a todos los lugares que solicitan este recurso.
    En segundo, la gran cantidad de proveedores dificulta la llegada de señales. Esto puede deberse al siguiente motivo. Si ya encontramos un nivel de infraestructuras que apoyen a las redes bajo, el hecho de que existan muchos proveedores de internet complica la situación ya que estos no tienen gran cantidad de infraestructuras (por tanto de recursos) para llegar a todos los hogares, lo que genera el problema de banda ancha.
    En mi opinión la solución para el problema de la banda ancha en Irlanda se puede encontrar en aumentar la inversión en infraestructuras para conseguir aumentar la red de banda ancha y reducir el número de proveedores para que el mercado se encuentre repartido entre un número menor de empresas, que contarán con mayor número de recursos (infraestructuras) para llegar con más potencia a todos los hogares.

    ResponderEliminar
    Respuestas
    1. ¡Muchas gracias por tu comentario y tus ideas, Antonio!

      Eliminar
  4. Este comentario ha sido eliminado por el autor.

    ResponderEliminar
  5. This article shows the start of the broadband in Ireland, which is actually one of the most technologycally advanced countries in Europe and which improved the quality of life of the population. As we can read, the firsts broadbands were installed in 2000, that fact was essential for the country to atract multinational companies to the country such as eBay, Google and more. It’ s interesting to see how in 2011 a study proved that Internet was essential in Ireland, knowing that 11 years ago there was no Internet in the country. Despite of the advanced technologies, there’s still the need to improve the standard of Internet access available to irish citizens around the counry.
    From my point of view, the solution to this problem is basically to invest more on infrastructures in order to optimise broadband in Ireland.

    ResponderEliminar
  6. Este comentario ha sido eliminado por el autor.

    ResponderEliminar
  7. This article is about the process of installing broadband in Ireland, which is considered as one of the most technologically advanced countries in Europe. This process started approximately in 1998 with the DSL connections, which represented the first way of access to the internet. Because of the growing demand for internet access and the improvement of the economy in 2000’s appeared the broadband. Since this year the broadband has been in continuous development, improving it speech and attracting various enterprises in Ireland. But, as the broadband doesn’t stop improving in the urban areas, there is actually a gap in the rural areas which people are waiting to get a solution to have a high speed access internet.
    In my opinion, the solution is to invest more in infrastructure in order to satisfy the demand of the people and to keep this country on the top of the more advanced countries of the region.

    ResponderEliminar
  8. Este artículo comenta las diferencias que hay en Irlanda con respecto a las conexiones de Internet. Nos muestra que hay dos bandos muy diferenciados: el primero de ellos nos muestra que en las grandes ciudades del país hay una muy buena conexión a internet, rápida y segura. En el otro bando nos encontramos que en las zonas rurales existe una conexión anticuada, mediante DSL y ADSL.
    Pude experimentar esta diferencia, ya que hace dos meses estuve en Irlanda. Durante los primeros días estuve en Dublin, y la conexión era excelente. Había WiFi en los hoteles y restaurantes y de muy buena calidad. En cambio, huno un día que fui a los Cliffs de Moher, al oeste del país, en dónde había una conexión muy escasa o inexistente. Aquí pude ver las diferencias entre las zonas rurales y las grandes ciudades de Irlanda.
    Personalmente, creo que el gobierno debería invertir en mejorar y crear las infraestructuras necesarias para que haya una igualdad de condiciones entre las dos zonas, para que toda la población pueda tener las mismas condiciones en cuanto a conexiones de internet.

    ResponderEliminar
    Respuestas
    1. Para los amantes del turismo "desconectado", esas zonas rurales con escasez de banda ancha pueden entrañar más atractivo, más allá de los inconvenientes para los lugareños. ¡Muchas gracias por tu comentario, Àngel!

      Eliminar
  9. Este comentario ha sido eliminado por el autor.

    ResponderEliminar
  10. El artículo nos habla de Irlanda, la cual ahora se considera como uno de los países más avanzados tecnológicamente no solo en Europa, si no en el mundo. Mas concretamente habla sobre la implantación de banda ancha en el país y como ha ido evolucionando este hasta convertiste en lo que es actualmente.

    Al principio de su implantación, mientras que Irlanda se convertía en precursora en Europa de las velocidades de conexión de banda ancha, muchos se dieron cuenta de la diferencia entre las redes de banda ancha urbanas y rurales. Poco a poco el uso de Internet se estaba convirtiendo en una necesidad básica para la población y se hizo cada vez mas notorio que se debían implementar medidas para rectificar el estándar de banda ancha inferior en Irlanda rural.

    Actualmente esta diferencia de comunicaciones entre la Irlanda rural y la urbana sigue existiendo y todavía queda bastante por hacer para que se pueda mejorar la situación. En nuestra opinión creemos que la mejora de la banda ancha en estas zonas contribuirá al desarrollo no solo económico sino que también social de la población irlandesa.

    ResponderEliminar
    Respuestas
    1. La dicotomía entre zonas rurales y urbanas se percibe con claridad en Irlanda. ¡Muchas gracias por tu comentario, Ester!

      Eliminar
  11. Este comentario ha sido eliminado por el autor.

    ResponderEliminar

  12. Es un artículo muy interesante que nos habla de la implantación de la banda ancha en irlanda y de su evolución. La implantación fue en el año 2000 y esto hizo que muchas empresas se interesan en ir para irlanda por su gran conexión y velocidad. Esto muy muy importante para Irlanda ya que creció bastante.

    También es interesante el echo de que hay dos tipos muy diferenciados de conexión en irlanda, el urbano y el rural, en la capital y ciudades grandes, la banda ancha es muy rápida, hay muy buena conexzion( de las mejores del mundo) y en todos los sitios podrás estar conectado a internet, pero en las zonas rurales, no hay banda ancha y tienen una conexión muy lenta y anticuada… Es muy interesante esta diferencia y espero que poco a poco vaya evolucionando más y pueda llegar a haber buena conexión en todo el país.

    ResponderEliminar
    Respuestas
    1. Conseguir la universalización de un acceso garantizado a Internet no es tarea sencilla, pero la mayor parte de políticas públicas de los países implicados lo intentan. ¡Muchas gracias por tu comentario, Ana!

      Eliminar
  13. Este artículo nos presenta la situación actual de Irlanda en cuanto a la implantación de la banda ancha, así como su historia y evolución de este factor en el país.

    Tal y como nos explica, y teniendo en cuenta que Irlanda es uno de los países más avanzados tecnológicamente, no fue hace más de 20 años que se implantó la conexión de banda ancha en el país. Sin embargo, a pesar de la cantidad de empresas que deciden invertir y empezar un negocio en este lugar, las conexiones entre las zonas rurales y urbanas siguen siendo notables. Hace un año estuve en Irlanda, concretamente residí en Dublín y, aunque la conexión en bares y restaurantes de la zona era fluida, es cierto que en una escapada a un pueblo irlandés pude notar la diferencia en la rapidez de la conexión.

    Desde mi punto de vista, y tal y como el texto asegura, queda mucho por hacer. Creo que el gobierno irlandés, así como la UE, deberían inveritir más en infraestructuras y en la mejora de la banda ancha, ya no solo por la población, sino por todos aquellos turistas que decidan visitar el país. Puede ser un avance importante en cuanto a su desarrollo económico y social.

    Maria Periche.

    ResponderEliminar
    Respuestas
    1. Interesante experiencia la tuya, Maria. La banda ancha es el principal indicador de desarrollo en pleno siglo XXI. ¡Muchas gracias por tu comentario!

      Eliminar
  14. El crecimiento que ha tenido el internet y la implementación de la banda ancha a lo largo de estos últimos años ha sido exorbitante y sobretodo en el caso de Irlanda. A pesar de ello, no podemos ignorar la gran diferencia entre la conexión del medio urbano y del rural. En el caso del medio urbano la conexión es excelente, en cambio en el rural es pésima.
    En mi opinión, creo que la administración pública debería invertir más dinero en equipar los espacios rurales, sobretodo los lugares públicos, en donde el internet no funciona correctamente.

    ResponderEliminar
    Respuestas
    1. Evitar el "gap" territorial debe ser prioritario. ¡Muchas gracias por tu comentario, Deniz!

      Eliminar